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Advances in Science and Research Contributions in Applied Meteorology and Climatology
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Volume 2, issue 1
Adv. Sci. Res., 2, 81–87, 2008
https://doi.org/10.5194/asr-2-81-2008
© Author(s) 2008. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Adv. Sci. Res., 2, 81–87, 2008
https://doi.org/10.5194/asr-2-81-2008
© Author(s) 2008. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  27 May 2008

27 May 2008

High resolution modelling results of the wind flow over Canary Islands during the meteorological situation of the extratropical storm Delta (28–30 November 2005)

O. Jorba1, C. Marrero2, E. Cuevas2, and J. M. Baldasano1,3 O. Jorba et al.
  • 1Earth Sciences Department, Barcelona Supercomputing Center – Centro Nacional de Supercomputación (BSC-CNS), Barcelona, Spain
  • 2Izaña Atmospheric Research Center, National Institute of Meteorology, Tenerife, Spain
  • 3Environmental Modelling Laboratory, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), Barcelona, Spain

Abstract. On 28–29 November 2005 an extratropical storm affected the Canary Islands causing significant damage related to high average wind speeds and intense gusts over some islands of the archipelago. Delta was the twenty-sixth tropical or subtropical storm of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. It represents an unusual meteorological phenomenon for that region, and its impacts were underestimated by the different operational meteorological forecasts during the previous days of the arrival of the low near Canary Islands.

The aim of this study is to reproduce the local effects of the flow that were observed over the Canary Islands during the travel of the Delta storm near the region using high-resolution mesoscale meteorological simulations. The Advanced Research Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF-ARW) is applied at 9, 3 and 1 km horizontal resolution using ECMWF forecasts as initial and boundary conditions. The high-resolution simulation will outline the main features that contributed to the high wind speeds observed in the archipelago. Variations in vertical static stability, vertical windshear and the intense synoptic winds of the southwestern part of Delta with a warm core at 850 hPa were the main characteristics that contributed to the development and amplification of intense gravity waves while the large-scale flow interacted with the complex topography of the islands.

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