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Adv. Sci. Res., 15, 11-14, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/asr-15-11-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
 
13 Feb 2018
Applications of a shadow camera system for energy meteorology
Pascal Kuhn1, Stefan Wilbert1, Christoph Prahl1, Dominik Garsche1, David Schüler1, Thomas Haase1, Lourdes Ramirez2, Luis Zarzalejo2, Angela Meyer3, Philippe Blanc4, and Robert Pitz-Paal5 1German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Solar Research, Plataforma Solar de Almería, Ctra. De Senés s/n km 5, 04200 Tabernas, Spain
2CIEMAT, Energy Department – Renewable Energy Division, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid, Spain
3MeteoSwiss, Les Invuardes, 1530 Payerne, Switzerland
4MINES ParisTech, PSL Research University, O. I. E. Centre Observation, Impacts, Energy, CS 10207, 06904, Sophia Antipolis CEDEX, France
5German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Solar Research, Linder Höhe, 51147 Cologne, Germany
Abstract. Downward-facing shadow cameras might play a major role in future energy meteorology. Shadow cameras directly image shadows on the ground from an elevated position. They are used to validate other systems (e.g. all-sky imager based nowcasting systems, cloud speed sensors or satellite forecasts) and can potentially provide short term forecasts for solar power plants. Such forecasts are needed for electricity grids with high penetrations of renewable energy and can help to optimize plant operations. In this publication, two key applications of shadow cameras are briefly presented.
Citation: Kuhn, P., Wilbert, S., Prahl, C., Garsche, D., Schüler, D., Haase, T., Ramirez, L., Zarzalejo, L., Meyer, A., Blanc, P., and Pitz-Paal, R.: Applications of a shadow camera system for energy meteorology, Adv. Sci. Res., 15, 11-14, https://doi.org/10.5194/asr-15-11-2018, 2018.
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Downward-facing shadow cameras might play a major role in future energy meteorology. Shadow cameras image shadows directly on the ground from an elevated position. They are used to validate other systems (e.g. all-sky imager based nowcasting systems, cloud speed sensors or satellite forecasts) and can potentially provide short term forecasts for solar power plants. Such forecasts are needed for electricity grids with high penetrations of renewable energy and solar power plants.
Downward-facing shadow cameras might play a major role in future energy meteorology. Shadow...
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